Effective Internet Search

FREE SEARCH HELP

On Site Resources

Search Tool Guide

BUY THE BOOK
ABOUT THE BOOK
FAQ's
Audiences
User Benefits
Overview & Contents
Book Excerpts
Awards-Reviews
Updates
OTHER
Contact Us
Authors
Discussion Topics
Sales Affiliates
 

Effective Internet Search: Research

Cost$ of Not Searching Well

by Judith Gill
  1. Wasted time and energy - missed opportunities

Self-taught users miss out on so many Internet experiences because they do not know the full scope of available choices. 
- Paul Gil, The Frustrations of Not Understanding the Internet, 2004 [1]

There are literally billions of pages of documents on the Internet. And, over three hundred freely-available search engines, each with their own methods for collecting, cataloging, and retrieving information.

Yet, most people simply flounder about, using trial and error to locate content. Moreover, because they don't search well, they can't take full advantage of the Internet, profiting from the amazing quantity and quality of information sources.

Implications for you: If you have enough time, energy and persistence, you may eventually find the information you want. Or, you can invest some time now to improve your search skills, reaping future payoffs in locating your content quickly and efficiently. Further, you won't miss the tremendous opportunities and discoveries awaiting you on the Internet.

  1. Coping with an information explosion!

It is clear that we are all drowning in a sea of information. The challenge is to learn to swim in that sea, rather than drown in it.
- University of California, Berkeley School of Information Management and Systems, October 2000 [2]

"All of a sudden, almost every aspect of life around the world is being recorded and stored in some information format," says University of California, Berkeley researcher Peter Lyman [3]. In only three years, the amount of new information generated and cataloged globally in 2002 has more than doubled, according to his latest study. With the amount of stored information growing at a rate of about 30 percent a year, if you feel overwhelmed by this now, the bad news is there's no end in sight.

Implications for you: In future, it won't get any easier to locate the information you want.

  1. Cost of not finding information

Handling too much information, as well as not being able to find information when it is needed, constitutes a significant cost to today's enterprises.
- Susan Feldman, Vice President for Content Technologies, IDC, April 2003 [4]

Feldman's recent study, "The High Cost of Not Finding Information," explores and quantifies the impact and costs of not finding information. Among its conclusions, an organization with 1000 knowledge workers can annually lose up to:

  • $2.5 million in time spent searching;
  • $5 million in intellectual rework;
  • $15 million in lost opportunity costs [5].

Implications for you: It is very costly to both you and your organization if you can't locate the specific information you require when you need it.

  1. Strategic value of information

It's not just the quantity of information that is growing. The information is becoming more strategic to a company.
- Gil Press, Director of Corporate Information, EMC Corporation [6]

Regardless of your purpose or what you do in life, be it student, professional, business person, knowledge worker, IT specialist, etc., the real challenge is to organize, sort, manage and make sense of all this new data, if you are to maximize its value.

Implications for you: Information provides strategic value to individuals and organizations but you have to be able to find it first.

Searching well matters

Search engines are really the gateway to the Internet; they're the front door.
- iProspect CEO Frederick Marckini, April 2004 [7]

Studies have consistently shown that the vast majority of people seek information through search engines. Searching well does matter and the costs for not doing so are high.


References & Links
  1. Paul Gil, Internet 101: The Frustrations of Not Understanding the Internet, About.com, 2004: netforbeginners.about.com/cs/internet101/a/internet101.htm
  2. University of California, Berkeley School of Information Management and Systems, How Much Information?, Peter Lyman and Hal. R. Varian, October 18, 2000: www.sims.berkeley.edu/research/projects/how-much-info
  3. University of California, Berkeley School of Information Management and Systems, How Much Information? 2003, Peter Lyman and Hal. R. Varian, October 27, 2003: www.sims.berkeley.edu/research/projects/how-much-info-2003/
  4. IDC, The High Cost of Not Finding Information, Chris Sherman and Susan Feldman, April 2003: www.idc.com/getdoc.jhtml?containerId=29127
  5. Qualysys Global, EQMS Cost Benefit, 2003: www.qualsys.co.uk/eqms_cost.htm
  6. Byte and Switch, Info Overload! Billions of Bytes Born, Dave Raffo, October 28, 2003: www.byteandswitch.com/document.asp?doc_id=42612
  7. MediaPost, MediaDailyNews, Females More Likely to Fly Search Coop, Finds Part Two of iProspect Survey, Kate Kaye, April 20, 2004: www.mediapost.com/dtls_dsp_news.cfm?newsId=247485

FREE SEARCH HELP

On Site Resources

Search Tool Guide

BUY THE BOOK
ABOUT THE BOOK
FAQ's
Audiences
User Benefits
Overview & Contents
Book Excerpts
Awards-Reviews
Updates
OTHER
Contact Us
Authors
Discussion Topics
Sales Affiliates


Effective Internet Search: E-Searching Made Easy!      Baylin Systems, Inc., 2006